YOU CAN RAISE A GOOD FAMILY AND NURTURE GREAT CAREER AT SAME TIME

By Gloria Nakiyimba

Are you a young career woman, scared of mixing career and raising a family?  Well don’t be.  Young women can succeed in nurturing both a stellar career and raising a good family at the same time.

This piece of advice was sounded by the Director of Voice America-VOA who has just concluded her tour of affiliate media houses in Uganda.

Amanda Bennett   is encouraging career women who are afraid of   parenthood to always consider the positive benefits a career brings to the family

“One of my big advice to young women, to young families, is don’t always think about the negative things. Think about the positive things you are doing for your family’” she said.

Many young women worldwide worry too much about raising a family without affecting their career.

“ One of the thing  I thought when I was very young, was that If I worked really very hard, and spent a lot of time at work,  I was going to hurt my family”  said Bennett

However she hastens to add that your career should help you shape up your family in a constructive manner.

“I just got a note from my son while I was on this trip, to say mum I am now older and I know; I think you are so inspiring and am so inspired by you.  It so touched me to think about all the years I  had been  working , that it was not hurting him at all, it was not hurting his sister all, it was actually helping them understand how to be out in the world”  she told Capital radio reporter.

Amanda Bennet is a Pulitzer award winning journalist and author with a stellar career spanning more than 40 years.

She underscores the importance of enjoying your work if one is to succeed in building a great career.

According to her, there are two things that can help journalists thrive in their work.

“I got into this because I wanted to change the world. I think a lot of journalist did but I stayed in it because it was so much fun. And if you don’t have fun at what you’re doing every day, what’s the point” she stated.

Despite the tight daily work schedules, she encouraged Journos to always set aside some time for fun.

“ You are journalists ,you are doing important things, every day you are getting to go  out and  talk to people, go to countries;  have as much fun as you  possibly can” she advised.

During her trip Amanda and her team visited the Kisementi based Capital Radio, one of Uganda’s leading privately owned FM stations in the market.

She met with the top management of Capital FM steered by the General Manager Peter Jackson Mungoma and Programs Director George Manyali.

She was accompanied by Dr. Joyce Ngoh VOA Regional Marketing Director: Africa, Negussie Mengesha VOA Director, Africa Division,   Mwamoyo Hamza, VOA chief, Swahil service and officials from the American embassy in Kampala.

Brad and Angelina Jolie agree to keep their divorce process under wraps

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt have agreed to work together for the sake of their family.

The actors released a joint statement Monday evening stating that they have reached an agreement to handle their divorce in a private forum and will keep future details of their divorce confidential by utilizing a private judge.

According to the statement obtained by PEOPLE, “The parties and their counsel have signed agreements to preserve the privacy rights of their children and family by keeping all court documents confidential and engaging a private judge to make any necessary legal decisions and to facilitate the expeditious resolution of any remaining issues.”

It concludes: “The parents are committed to act as a united front to effectuate recovery and reunification.”

For the past several weeks, Pitt, 53, and Jolie, 41, had been trading harsh accusations in filings in Los Angeles Superior Court, but recently both agreed to seal sensitive records relating to their six children.

Pitt and Jolie — who are parents to Maddox, 15, Pax, 13, Zahara, 11, Shiloh, 10, and twins Knox and Vivienne, 8 — have a voluntary temporary custody agreement in place that allows Pitt supervised visitation with the children.

-Yahoo

We want the happily ever after, but we don’t want to put the effort

We want a second coffee cup in our Instagrams of lazy Saturday mornings, another pair of shoes in our artsy pictures of our feet. We want a Facebook official relationship every one can like and comment on, we want the social media post that wins #relationshipgoals. We want a date for Sunday morning brunch, someone to commiserate with during the drudge of Mondaze, a Taco Tuesday partner, someone to text us good morning on Wednesday. We want a plus one for all the weddings we keep getting invited to (how did they do it? How did they find their happily ever after?). But we are the generation who doesn’t want a relationship.

We swipe left in hopes of finding the right person. We try to special order our soulmate like a request on Postmates. We read 5 Ways to Know He’s Into You and 7 Ways to Get Her to Fall For You, in hopes of being able to upcycle a person into a relationship like a Pinterest project. We invest more time in our Tinder profiles than our personalities. Yet we don’t want a relationship.

We “talk” and we text, we Snapchat and we sext. We hangout and we happy hour, we go to coffee and grab a beer – anything to avoid an actual date. We private message to meet up, we small talk for an hour only to return home and small talk via text. We forgo any chance of achieving real connection by mutually playing games with no winner. Competing for “Most Detached”, “Biggest Apathetic Attitude”, and “Best at Being Emotionally Unavailable”, what we end up actually winning is “Most Likely to Be Alone”.

We want the façade of a relationship, but we don’t want the work of a relationship. We want the hand holding without the eye contact, the teasing without the serious conversations. We want the pretty promise without the actual commitment, the anniversaries to celebrate without the 365 days of work that leads up to them. We want the happily ever after, but we don’t want to put the effort in the here and now. We want the deep connection, while keeping things shallow. We long for that world series kind of love, without being willing to go to bat.

We want someone to hold our hand, but we don’t want to put the power to hurt us in their hands. We want cheesy pick up lines, but we don’t want to be picked up… for that involves the possibility of being set down. We want to be swept off our feet, yet at the same time remaining safely, independently, standing on our own. We want to keep chasing the idea of love, but we don’t want to actually fall into it.

We don’t want relationships – we want friends with benefits, Netflix and chill, nudes on Tinder. We want anything that will give us the illusion of a relationship, without being in an actual relationship. We want all the rewards and none of the risk, all of the payout and none of the cost. We want to connect – enough, but not too much. We want to commit – a little, but not a lot. We take it slow: we see where it goes, we don’t label things, we just hang out. We keep one foot out the door, we keep one eye open, and we keep people at arm’s length – toying with their emotions but most of all toying with our own.

When things get too close to being real, we run. We hide. We leave. There’s always more fish in the sea. There’s always another chance at finding love. There’s just such a little chance of keeping it these days…

We hope to swipe right into happiness. We want to download the perfect fit like a new app – that can be updated every time there’s a hitch, easily compartmentalized into a folder, deleted when we have no more use for it. We don’t want to unpack our baggage – or, worse, help someone unpack theirs. We want to keep the ugly behind the coverup, hide the imperfections with an Instagram filter, choose another episode on Netflix over a real conversation. We like the idea of loving someone despite their flaws; yet we keep our skeletons locked in the closet, happy to never let them see the light of day.

We feel entitled to love, like we feel entitled to full time jobs out of college. Our trophies-for-everyone youth has taught us that if we want something, we deserve it. Our over-watched Disney VHSs taught us true love, soul mates, and happily ever after exist for everyone. And so we put in no effort, and wonder why our prince charming hasn’t appeared. We sit around, upset that our princess is no where to be found. Where is our consolation prize? We showed up, we’re here. Where’s the relationship we deserve? The true love we’ve been promised?

We want a placeholder, not a person. We want a warm body, not a partner. We want someone to sit on the couch next to us, as we aimlessly scroll through another newsfeed, open another app to distract us from our lives. We want to walk this middle line: pretending we don’t have emotions while wearing our heart on our sleeve, wanting to be needed by someone yet not wanting to need someone. We play hard to get just to test if someone will play hard enough – we don’t even fully understand it ourselves. We sit around with friends discussing the rules, but no one even knows the game we’re trying to play. Because the problem with our generation not wanting relationships is that, at the end of the day, we actually do.

 

 

 

 

-Huffingtonpost

Obama wont be speaking at Malia’s Graduation, he will get emotional

When it comes to his daughter Malia’s upcoming high school graduation, President Obama is already preparing to shed a few tears.

While lunching at the Jolly Pumpkin Brewery in Detroit today, Obama told his lunch companions that he turned down a request to speak at Malia’s graduation, saying he will be too emotional.

“Malia’s school asked if I wanted to speak at commencement and I said no,” the president said. “I’m going to be wearing dark glasses … and I’m going to cry.”

The entirety of President Obama’s comments could not be overheard as his exchange was caught only sporadically on audio.

Malia, the president’s elder daughter, is currently in her senior year of high school and is set to graduate this spring.

 

 

 

 

 

-ABC

 

 

 

 

Katuramu’s fate lies in reconciliation with the Kijanagoma family

President Museveni has said the releasing of former Tooro Kingdom prime minister ,John Katuramu from Luzira prisons could cause more problems if his family does not reconcile with that of prince David Kijanangoma.

At the NRM presidential campaign rally at the Boma grounds in Fort Portal, several party supporters turned up at the campaign rally carrying big posters of Katuramu asking the president to pardon him.

Museveni however said that Katuramu’s wife had approached him several times pleading for a pardon. He told the gathering that he advised Katuramu’s wife to first seek reconciliation and forgiveness with Kijanagoma’s family.

“I have no problem pardoning Katuramu. I advised Katuramu’s wife to sit down with the deceased’s family and seek reconciliation. If they accept, then I have no problem Katuramu being a free man,” Museveni said.

In an interview with Uganda Radio Network, Prince David Kijanangoma, the deceased’s younger brother said that two years ago they had been approached by Katuramu’s family asking for forgiveness. Kijanangoma also said that when they visited Katuramu at Luzira Prison, he was remorseful for the crime he committed.

According to Kijanangoma, a family decision was later reached to forgive Katuramu.

Katuramu was convicted and sentenced to death in 1999, for masterminding the murder of the then Tooro Prince Patrick Happy Kijanagoma and a guard, Stephen Kaganda. The incident occurred at Palace View Bar Hotel in Fort Portal town.

Additional reporting from URN